Museums & Tours

Explore Leadville's roots in the Victorian era, learn about the mining boom, and all the fascinating people who lived in or passed through these parts!

Healy House Museum & Dexter Cabin

Healy House Museum & Dexter Cabin

August R. Meyer’s 1878 Greek Revival clapboard house (now called Healy House) was built for his bride, Emma. The home has been beautifully restored and features lavish Victorian furnishings collected by Leadville pioneers. For years it was a sought-after boarding house and a hub of social life, with croquet on the lawn as Nellie Healy entertained guests in the parlor. Beside the mansion is the surprisingly plush 1879 log cabin that was mining investor and businessman James V. Dexter’s Leadville residence. Open from roughly Memorial Day to Columbus Day from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., last daily tour is 3:45 p.m. $6 for adults, $5.50 for seniors, $4.50 for children 6-12, free for children under 6.
Location: 912 Harrison Ave.
Phone: 719-486-0487

Heritage Museum & Gallery

The museum boasts a fine collection of Leadville memorabilia - Victorian furniture, mining, and boomtown miscellany. View the replica of the world’s largest palace of ice build in Leadville in 1896, and the photographs and mementos of the 10th Mountain Division soldiers that trained at Camp Hale and Ski Cooper during World War II. Open 10:00 - 5:00 daily from Memorial Day weekend through the last weekend in September. $6 for adults, $3 for students aged 6-16 yrs, free for children under 6.
Location: 102 E. 9th St.
Phone: (719) 486-1878

Matchless Mine

The Matchless Mine is located on the fabulously mineral-rich Fryer Hill in Leadville’s Historic Mining District. The Matchless mining claim, estimated to have produced $7.5 million, contributed greatly to the wealth of its owner, silver baron Horace Tabor and his wife Elizabeth “Baby Doe” Tabor. Daily guided tours leave at 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. and last approximately 1 hour. The mine site is open for self-guided tours 12:00 to 4:45 p.m. from late May through late September.
Location: 1.25 miles up East 7th St.
Phone: 719-486-1229
National Mining Hall of Fame & Museum

National Mining Hall of Fame & Museum

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum is a monument to the memory of the men and women who pioneered the discovery, development, and processing of our nation’s natural resources. Known as the “Smithsonian of the Rockies,” our museum houses 25,000 square feet of interactive and informative exhibits showcasing our collection of mining’s colorful history. Open 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas, & New Year’s Day. General admission $12, see website for student, senior, military & more discounts, and group rates..
Location: 120 West 9th St.
Phone: 719-486-1229
Route of the Silver Kings Tour

Route of the Silver Kings Tour

Self-guided driving tour through the historic mining district surrounding Leadville. Stops include mines, mining camps, ghost towns, and more. Detailed brochures available at the Chamber of Commerce.
Location: Starts at Harrison & E 7th St.
Phone: 719-486-3900

Tabor Home

The home of Horace Tabor and his first wife, Augusta, was built around 1877 on Harrison Ave, then moved to it`s current location on 5th St.The two lived in the house until 1881, when Horace left Augusta for his mistress "Baby Doe." Augusta, Leadville`s "First Lady," had great courage, super-human endurance and extraordinary business acumen. A dozen years after the sensational divorce, she died a millionaire. In that same year, Horace went bankrupt. Home is open Memorial Day to Labor Day.
Location: 116 East 5th St.
Phone: 303-550-1049
Tabor Opera House

Tabor Opera House

Built in 1879 by Horace Tabor, the opera house was once billed as the finest theater between St. Louis and San Francisco, and had many famous performers including Harry Houdini, John Philip Sousa, Oscar Wilde, Sarah Bernhardt and Anna Held. Check the calendar for tours & performances during summer months.
Location: 308 Harrison Ave.
Phone: 303-550-1049

Temple Israel

Built in 1884, this frontier synagogue served a surprisingly large and active Jewish community until about 1912. Although no longer a regular, active synagogue, the building was fully restored by 2008. A permanent exhibition opened in 2012 that documents pioneer Jewish life with a collection of artifacts about Leadville, its resident Jews, Temple Israel as a synagogue, and life in a mining town in the 1880s and 1890s.
Location: 201 West 4th St.
Phone: 303.709.7050